The ambitious courageous and moral cowardice of macbeth in william shakespeares play macbeth

There are many factors, which contribute to the degeneration of Macbeth.

The ambitious courageous and moral cowardice of macbeth in william shakespeares play macbeth

Next Act One Scene 7 This scene can be seen as a false turning point. After reflecting on the murder of Duncan in a soliloquy, it seems as if Macbeth will now turn back. Having thought through all the strong moral objections to the murder, he tells Lady Macbeth they will 'go no further' with it.

However, when she taunts him with cowardice, saying she will see this as a test of his love for her, he quickly changes his mind, resolving to put on a 'false face'. Some people interpret this scene by saying Macbeth is a good but weak man who knows the murder would be wrong but gives in to his wife's bullying.

But look at the evidence! Macbeth knows full well there are good reasons he should not murder Duncan: Besides, Duncan is a good man who will be mourned by all. In the discussion with his wife, Macbeth does not mention any of these points!

Is this because Lady Macbeth could not refute any of them? He allows himself to be lured into a digression on the nature of manhood.

Macbeth himself has admitted to "vaulting ambition". Is it not more likely he allows himself to be persuaded, because he wanted to be overruled?

His reaction to her horrible image of dashing out the brains of her own child is inappropriate — he praises her! He also eagerly accepts her suggestion of throwing guilt on the innocent guards, even embellishing it with the revolting detail of smearing the king's blood on them.

At first Macbeth shows signs of mental breakdown: He refuses to return the daggers to the scene of the murder, unmoved by his wife's taunts that he is behaving like a child. He seems so obsessed with the blood on his hands she has to force him to get his nightgown on when they hear someone knocking on the castle door.

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However, we must not be tempted to feel sympathy for him too readily. Do you notice how Macbeth feels sorry only for himself, rather than revealing any true remorse for what he has done to Duncan? When Lennox and Macduff are let into the castle he is able to act as if he is calm and unperturbed: Notice that even though there is a scene break here, the action is continuous, linked by the knocking at the gate — there has been no time for Macbeth to calm himself.

He even stabs the innocent guards to death before they can act as witnesses.Macbeth: Character Analysis of Macbeth Macbeth was a true Shakespearean tragic hero.

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He had many noble qualities as well as several tragic flaws. He was a courageous, brave and good nobleman who was haunted by superstition, moral cowardice and an overwhelming ambition. He was a courageous, brave and good nobleman who was haunted by superstition, moral cowardice and an overwhelming ambition.(Boyce) Macbeth’s ambition to be king starts off as just a desire and progressively as the play goes on it becomes his tragic flaws.

Act One Scene 7. This scene can be seen as a false turning point. After reflecting on the murder of Duncan in a soliloquy, it seems as if Macbeth will now turn back. Guilt and Conscience in Shakespeare’s Macbeth Essay. Words 6 Pages. Destruction of Guilt In William Shakespeare's play Macbeth he uses many forms of imagery, he uses this imagery to outline major themes in the book.

More about Guilt and Conscience in Shakespeare’s Macbeth Essay. Macbeth: Macbeth A Tragic Hero In the play Macbeth by William Shakespeare, we discover that Macbeth is a tragic hero.

Macbeth is very ambitious, courageous, and a moral coward: all these things lead to his tragic death at the end of the play. Macbeth: Macbeth A Tragic Hero In the play Macbeth by William Shakespeare, we discover that Macbeth is a tragic hero. Macbeth is very ambitious, courageous, and a moral coward: all these things lead to his tragic death at the end of the play.

The ambitious courageous and moral cowardice of macbeth in william shakespeares play macbeth
Macbeth by William Shakespeare - Essay